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MySQL HA Presentation from Oracle's MySQL Sunday

MySQL Sunday at Oracle's Open world was a huge success given that it was MySQL's first year at the conference. I had a lot of fun and even a little excitement when a shirt caught fire during my presentation.

Just added a video to the site for MySQL High Availability. Check it out here if you missed it at MySQL Sunday, also, you can get the slides in PDF format here.

You can also check out all the other presentations here, brought to you by PalominoDB.

-- UPDATE --
9-29-10

Recently I was contacted by a fellow community member at Oracle who had some great clarifications/corrections to the MySQL Cluster portion of my presentation. Here is long short:

Problem #1:

Geographical redundancy through MySQL replication (Asynchronous)
Can be a single point of failure.

Question:
How is this a SPOF? You can configure multiple replication channels,
with different sql nodes in the master cluster, and fail over between
them.

Answer:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/mysql-cluster-replication-tw...
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/mysql-cluster-replication-fa...

My Thoughts:


I'll be a bit more careful next time in my use of "can be"!!!!

Problem #2:

"In Memory data storage
Does not work well for large datasets
"

Answer/Clarification:

Non-indexed columns can be written to on-disk tablespaces since MySQL 5.1 (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/mysql-cluster-limitations-di...).

“Maximum data file size: The theoretical limit is 64G; however, in
MySQL 5.1 (including MySQL Cluster NDB 6.X and 7.X through 7.1), the
practical upper limit is 32G. This is equivalent to 32768 extents of
1M each.”



"
Each on-disk data file has a practical max size of 32GB with each
tablespace having a maximum of 65536 files. This gives a practical
maximum size of 2TB per tablespace and theoretical max size of 4TB.
Each table could in theory be allocated its own tablespace with up to
2^32 (>4bn) tablespaces being allowed.
"

My Thoughts:

Large data was an older generalization I used in the presentation.

Thanks a bunch for the clarification on this, Community Member from Oracle!

Chris

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